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La Niña out of the spotlight

The La Niña has ended, but does that end our chance for drought in Central Texas this spring and summer? LCRA Chief Meteorologist Bob Rose shares an update.​

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Bob's Blog on Central Texas Weather

Update on the Threat for Rain and Thunderstorms Sunday into Monday.
Friday, February 17, 2017 5:34 PM

Here is an update on the pattern of wet weather expected Sunday into early next week.  Friday's forecast data showed some changes compared to previous outlooks; the rain and storms should be moving a bit faster and overall rain totals should be slightly lower.

A large trough of low pressure in the upper atmosphere is forecast to track into northwestern Mexico Saturday and push east towards Texas Sunday into Monday.  Ahead of the trough, a large area of Gulf moisture is expected to stream into the eastern half of Texas beginning Sunday night.

As atmospheric moisture levels increase, scattered rain showers and isolated thunderstorms look to develop across the area Sunday morning and Sunday afternoon.  Meanwhile, an area of thunderstorms is forecast to develop across West Central Texas early Sunday afternoon as the Dry Line begins pushing east out of West Texas.  The area of thunderstorms is then expected to congeal into a large line of rain and thunderstorms that will slowly move across the Hill Country late Sunday afternoon and Sunday evening.  The line of storms is forecast to move across the Interstate 35 corridor and Central Texas regions Sunday evening and Sunday night, reaching the middle Texas coast late Sunday night into Monday morning.   Lighter rains and isolated thunderstorms are expected behind the main line of storms Monday morning. The rain is then forecast to diminish from west to east Monday afternoon into Monday evening as drier and more stable air spreads into the area.

With a somewhat faster movement to the rain and storms, total rain amounts are not expected to be quite as heavy as previously forecast.  Updated rainfall forecasts through Tuesday now call for general totals to near 1 inch across the Hill Country, between 1 and 2 inches across Central Texas and near 2 inches across the coastal plains region.

National Weather Service rainfall forecast for the period from 6 pm Friday through 6 pm Wednesday:
Rain5.png

 

Friday's data continued to indicate that some of the thunderstorms Sunday afternoon and Sunday night may become strong to severe.  Large hail and damaging winds will be the primary severe weather threats.


Sunny and dry weather is forecast next Tuesday through Thursday as a weak ridge of high pressure sets up across Texas.  Expect high temperatures throughout the week in the 70s with low temperatures in the 50s.  A weak cold front looks to move across the area next Friday, bringing slightly cooler air for Friday and Saturday.  Expect high temperatures in the 60s and low temperatures in the 40s behind the cold front.

Have a good weekend.

Bob

Previous Blog Entries

Widespread Moderate to Heavy Rain Expected Sunday into Monday.
Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:15 PM

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Forecasters are closely monitoring a trough of low pressure in the eastern Pacific that will be pushing inland along the coast of California Friday.  The trough is forecast to sink south into northern Mexico Sunday and slowly move across Texas Monday through Tuesday.  This path is somewhat similar to the storm system which moved across Texas earlier this week.  However, forecast solutions indicate this time an unusually moist Gulf air mass, more typical of late summer or early fall, will be drawn into the eastern half of Texas in advance of the trough.  Strong atmospheric lift on the leading edge of the trough, combined with the abundant Gulf moisture is expected to cause a very efficient rain process beginning Sunday afternoon, continuing through Monday.  The trough itself will be moving fairly slowly, allowing the efficient rains to persist or possibly train over certain areas for a long period time.

The latest forecasts call for rain and thunderstorms to increase in areal coverage across the region during the day on Sunday.  Moderate to heavy rains are forecast across the Hill Country and Central Texas regions Sunday night through about midday Monday, with lighter rains continuing Monday afternoon through about midday Tuesday.  For the coastal plains region, the moderate to heavy rain is forecast to move in early Monday morning and persist throughout the day.  Lighter rains are then expected Monday night through Tuesday.  The rain is forecast to diminish from west to east Tuesday night.  Sunny and dry weather will return Wednesday through Friday.

Forecast solutions call for the highest totals of rain to occur generally along and to the east of the Interstate 35 corridor, with somewhat lower totals occurring across the Hill Country.  Totals of 1-2 inches are forecast across the Hill Country, with totals of 2-4 inches expected for areas along and east of I-35.  Isolated totals to near 6 inches will be possible.

National Weather Service rainfall forecast for the period from 6 pm Thursday through 6 pm Tuesday:
Rain11.png
 

In addition to the threat for heavy rain, there will also be risk for some of the storms to become strong or severe Sunday afternoon through Monday morning.  Atmospheric parameters are expected to be such that some of the storms could produce large hail and damaging wind gusts.  As of now, the threat for tornadoes is not expected to be all that high.

With the ground still wet from rains earlier this week, much of this additional rain will runoff, leading to possible flash flood threat.

I'll pass along another update on this wet pattern Friday afternoon.

Bob
Chilly Temperatures Observed Thursday Morning
Thursday, February 16, 2017 12:33 PM

It was a cold morning across Central Texas, with most Hill Country locations seeing a light freeze.  A hard freeze was observed for areas north of Lake Buchanan and to the west of Junction.  Across the rest of the region, the temperature stayed above freezing but did fall in the 30s.

According to LCRA's Hydromet, http://hydromet.lcra.org the temperature dipped to the upper 20s to low 30s across most of the Hill Country:

AccuPrecip.png 
The lowest gauged temperature was 24 degrees, at a gauge located in northwestern Kimble County, roughly 17 miles northwest of Junction.

Across Central Texas, readings generally dipped to the mid and upper 30s.  In Austin, the low temperature at Camp Mabry was 40 degrees.  At Austin-Bergstrom, the low temperature was 33 degrees.

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Across the middle Texas coast, the temperature generally bottomed out in the low 40s, although a few spots did reach the upper 30s.

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The temperature should be a little warmer tonight.  Low temperatures Friday morning will include the low and mid-40s across the Hill Country, the upper 40s across Central Texas and near 50 degrees across the coastal plains.

Bob

Dry Weather Expected through Late Week. Next Shot at Rain Expected Sunday.
Tuesday, February 14, 2017 5:59 PM

A Pacific storm system tracked across Texas Monday night, bringing a widespread area of rain and thunderstorms.  The highest totals of rain occurred across parts of Llano, Burnet, Gillespie and Blanco Counties in the Texas Hill Country.  Totals here generally ranged between 3 and 4 inches.  Across the rest of the region, totals were generally between 1 and 1.5 inches. Matagorda County along the middle Texas coast once again saw the least amount of rain, with most totals averaging less than an inch.  In Austin, Camp Mabry recorded 0.86 inches of rain and Austin-Bergstrom reported 1.24 inches.

National Weather Service estimated rain falling between 3 pm Monday and 3 pm Tuesday:
Untitled.png
 
The storms turned strong to severe when they moved across the coastal plains region of the middle and upper Texas coast.  A very moist and unstable atmosphere near the coast allowed for the development of strong downburst winds and a few brief tornadoes.  The National Weather Service confirms there were tornadoes near Van Vleck in Matagorda County, near Stafford and Rosenberg in Fort Bend County and also near Wharton.

Clouds and cool air have been spreading into Texas on the backside of the Pacific storm system.  These clouds will slowly clear form west to east late Tuesday night as the storm system moves toward the lower Mississippi Valley region.  Temperatures will be quite cool.  Low temperatures Wednesday morning will include the mid-30s across the Hill Country, around 40-42 degrees across Central Texas and the middle 40s towards the coast.  Do note that some of the traditional cooler valleys of the Hill Country could see a light freeze overnight.

A sunny and dry pattern is expected to develop Wednesday into Thursday in the wake of the departing storm system.  Canadian high pressure will keep temperatures on the cool side Wednesday, with high temperatures generally near 60 degrees.  Readings should warm to around 68-70 degrees on Thursday. Low temperatures Thursday morning will include the middle 30s across the Hill Country, the upper 30s across Central Texas and around 40 degrees towards the coast.  Low temperatures Friday morning look to be in the low and mid-40s.

Forecast solutions do show a weak trough of low pressure tracking east across Texas Friday, but with so little moisture in place, no rain is forecast across the Hill Country or Central Texas regions.  Just a slight chance for rain is forecast towards the coast.  Rain amounts, if any, should average less than a quarter inch.  Under a partly cloudy sky, the high temperature Friday will be in the low 70s.  Sunny and warm weather is forecast Saturday as the area trough of low pressure departs to the northeast.  Expect a high temperature near 80 degrees.

The weather pattern is forecast to turn unsettled beginning next Sunday when another area of low pressure from the Pacific tracks begins tracking east across northern Mexico.  Forecast solutions call for the low to slowly push east across Texas net Monday and Tuesday, finally exiting to the east on Wednesday.  Scattered rain showers and isolated thunderstorms are forecast to develop in advance of the low pressure system Sunday, with rain and thunderstorms increasing in coverage Monday into Tuesday.  The rain and storms should exit to the east next Wednesday.  Rainfall forecasts suggest widespread totals of 1-1.5 inches over the 3-day period.  High temperatures Sunday through Tuesday will be in the mid-70s, with low temperatures in the low and mid-60s.

Dry and warm weather is forecast next Wednesday through Friday, with daily high temperatures in the 70s.  Long-range forecast suggest these mild and dry conditions will likely continue through the end of the month.

Bob

Widespread Rain and Thunderstorms Expected Monday Night into Tuesday. Some Severe Storms Possible.
Monday, February 13, 2017 1:57 PM

A large area of rain showers and thunderstorms is forecast to develop across West Texas this evening and spread across the Hill Country and Central Texas regions tonight into Tuesday morning.  This large area of rain is forecast to move over the middle Texas coast throughout the day on Tuesday.

Midday observations showed a cloudy sky covering the Hill Country and Central Texas regions as Gulf moisture was spreading to the north in advance of a Pacific storm system.  Today's temperature will be slightly cooler due to the clouds and a weak cold front which pushed south across the area on Sunday.  Early this afternoon, the front was lifting back to the north as a warm front, stretching from near Houston to Bastrop, San Antonio and Eagle Pass.  With the front moving north, it will allow very moist air mass to spread north from the Gulf tonight into Tuesday.  This afternoon, a few spotty light rain showers will be possible across the region, but most locations will stay dry.  High temperatures will range from near 60 degrees across the northern Hill Country to the low and mid-70s across Central Texas to around 78-80 degrees near the coast.

A large area of low pressure in the upper atmosphere is currently centered just south of Arizona, over northwestern Mexico.  The low is forecast to move east-northeast across northern Mexico tonight, tracking across western and northwestern Texas on Tuesday and finally exiting to the middle Mississippi Valley region late Tuesday.  This evening, rain showers and scattered thunderstorms are forecast to increase in areal coverage across West Texas and the western Hill Country as the atmosphere becomes increasingly moist and unstable in advance of the low pressure system.  By about midnight, this area of rain and thunderstorms is forecast to slowly organize into large north-south oriented complex of rain showers and thunderstorms.  This complex of rain and storms is expected to spread east across the Hill Country overnight, reaching the Interstate 35 corridor by about daybreak Tuesday, and the coastal plains region around late morning.

Today's forecast data indicates some of the thunderstorms tonight and Tuesday could approach severe levels, producing large hail, damaging downburst winds and even a couple of isolated tornadoes.  The Storm Prediction Center has placed the Hill Country and the I-35 corridor under a Marginal Risk for severe thunderstorms through 6 am Tuesday.  A marginal risk means the forecasters feel isolated severe thunderstorms will be possible.  The marginal risk for severe thunderstorms will continue across the Austin/Interstate 35 corridor Tuesday morning.  But for areas east of I-35, the threat for severe storms will be greater, due to increased instability.  The Storm Prediction Center has placed all of Southeast Texas, including Fayette, Colorado, Wharton and Matagorda Counties under an Enhanced Risk for severe thunderstorms throughout the day on Tuesday.  An enhanced risk means the forecasters feel numerous severe thunderstorms will be possible, producing large hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes.

Moderate to occasionally heavy rain is forecast with the thunderstorm complex as it slowly spreads to the east Monday night through Tuesday.  While widespread flash flooding is not anticipated, the rain will cause rises on area creeks and streams and may lead to some street flooding in the more urban areas.  The National Weather Service's latest rainfall forecast, for the period 6 pm Monday through 6 pm Tuesday, calls for widespread totals of 1-2 inches, with isolated totals to near 3 inches possible.

NWS rainfall forecast for the period from 6 pm Monday through 6 pm Tuesday:
Rain10.png
 
The rain and thunderstorms look to taper off across the Hill Country Tuesday morning.  The rain should end from west to east across Central Texas and the middle Texas coast Tuesday afternoon.  A Canadian cold front is forecast to spread south across the region in the wake of the rain complex Monday night into Tuesday, causing breezy and cooler conditions.  High temperatures Tuesday are forecast to be in the low 50s across the Hill Country, in the mid and upper 50s across Central Texas and the low 70s across the coastal plains.  Expect a northwesterly breeze at 10-15 mph.  Mostly cloudy, dry and cool weather is forecast Tuesday night.  Low temperatures Wednesday morning are forecast to be near 38-40 degrees across the Hill Country, the low 40s across Central Texas and the mid to upper 40s across the coastal plains.

Mostly sunny and dry weather is expected across the region Wednesday through Saturday as a weak ridge of high pressure develops across Texas the southern Plains states.  High temperatures look to be near 58-62 degrees Wednesday, in the low and mid-60s on Thursday and in the low 70s Friday.  Readings are forecast to warm to around 78-80 degrees on Saturday.  Low temperatures Thursday and Friday mornings will range from the mid and upper 30s across the Hill Country to the low and mid-40s near the coast.  Low temperatures Saturday morning will be in the 50s.

Medium-range forecast solutions indicate another area of low pressure from the Pacific will track east across northern Mexico next weekend, moving across Texas late Sunday into Monday.  This system is forecast to bring an area of rain showers and thunderstorms to Central and South Texas next Sunday and Monday.  As of now, rain amounts from this system are forecast to total around 1-1.5 inches.

Generally dry and mild weather conditions are forecast next Tuesday through Friday.  High temperatures are forecast to be in the 70s, with low temperatures in the 40s and 50s.

Have a good week.

Bob

Widespread Rain Forecast Monday through Tuesday. Signficant Totals Expected.
Friday, February 10, 2017 2:12 PM

After a long stretch of quiet weather, a more active and unsettled weather pattern is forecast to develop and set up across our region Sunday, with this pattern continuing through the middle of next week.

Friday midday satellite images showed a large area of low clouds covering areas generally along and to the east of Interstate 35, where moisture is spreading north from the Gulf of Mexico.  These clouds are forecast to remain in place this afternoon and tonight, causing a cloudy to mostly cloudy sky.  Dry weather is expected this afternoon but a few sprinkles of light rain or patchy drizzle will be possible after midnight tonight.  Today's temperature is forecast to reach the low and mid-70s.  Low temperatures Saturday morning will generally be in the low and mid-60s.  Expect a southerly breeze at 10-15 mph.

A mostly cloudy sky is forecast to continue Saturday as additional moisture streams north from the Gulf.  A few sprinkles of light rain will be possible during the morning.  Despite the clouds, the temperature is forecast to become unseasonably warm.  Readings are forecast to reach the upper 80s across the western Hill Country, with low and middle 80s at most other locations.  Low temperatures Sunday morning will be in the low and mid-60s.  There will a southerly breeze at 10-15 mph throughout the day.

Changes in the weather pattern are forecast to begin taking place Sunday.  Mostly cloudy and warm weather will continue.  However, a Canadian cold front is forecast to push south out of North Texas Sunday afternoon.  The front is forecast to reach the northern Hill Country around midday and the Austin area during the mid to late afternoon.  The front should push off the middle Texas coast Sunday night.  There will be a slight chance for a few rain showers just ahead of and along the cold front, but significant rain is not expected.  For locations behind the cold front, the temperature will trend down into the 60s Sunday afternoon.  For locations south of the front, the temperature should reach the mid-70s.

Cloudy and cooler weather is forecast Sunday night as a Canadian air mass begins settling into Texas out of the Plains states.  A weak overrunning weather pattern will begin to develop, leading to areas of light rain showers and even a couple of isolated thunderstorms.  The probability for rain will be near 40 percent.  Low temperatures Monday morning will include the mid and upper 40s across the Hill Country, the low 50s across Central Texas and around 60-62 degrees across the coastal plains.

A large area of low pressure from the Pacific is forecast to move inland to a position over northwestern Mexico Sunday night into Monday.  The low is then expected to slowly track east-northeast Monday night into Tuesday, moving across northwestern Texas Tuesday night.  The approaching low is expected to cause overrunning rains to increase in areal coverage and intensity across the Hill Country and Central Texas regions Monday afternoon, with rain and even a few isolated thunderstorms continuing Monday night through Tuesday.  The rain is forecast to taper off Tuesday night into Wednesday morning.  For the coastal plains region, the most significant rains are forecast to occur Tuesday into Tuesday night, with the rain tapering off Wednesday morning as the trough exits to the northeast.  The rain is forecast to be mostly light to moderate in intensity through the period.  Note that it has been nearly a month since the last significant rain across the area, so the threat for flooding and flash flooding appears to be fairly low.  The probability for rain will be near 40 percent Monday, near 70 percent Monday night and near 80 percent Tuesday.

Significant totals of rain are forecast from the steady rains occurring between Sunday night and Wednesday morning.  The National Weather Service's rainfall forecast calls for the highest totals to occur mainly across West Central Texas, extending southeast into the northern Hill Country.  Here, 4-day totals are forecast to generally average near 3 inches.  Across the rest of the region, totals are forecast to generally average around 2-2.5 inches.  Isolated heavier totals will be possible.  This overrunning-type rainfall pattern forecast next week typically does not lead to excessive totals of rain.

NWS rainfall forecast for the period from 6 am Friday through 6 am next Friday, 2/17:
Rain6.png
     
The chance for rain should end from west to east Wednesday morning into Wednesday afternoon, with the sky becoming partly cloudy.  Mostly sunny and dry weather is forecast next Thursday and Friday.  The temperature will be noticeably cooler next week.  High temperatures Monday through Wednesday look to be around 55-58 degrees.  Low temperatures Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings will include the upper 30s across the Hill Country, the low and mid-40s across Central Texas and the upper 40s to low 50s across the coastal plains.   High temperatures Thursday and Friday will be in the mid-60s.

Long-range forecasts call for a warming trend next weekend.  The next chance for rain is expected to occur sometime around next Monday, February 20th when another Pacific trough of low pressure tracks across Texas out of Mexico.  The long-range forecasts continue to indicate the jet stream pattern will be unfavorable for the delivery of arctic air into Texas over the next ten-day to two week period.
 

LUNAR ECLIPSE FRIDAY NIGHT:   Tonight's full moon will bring a lunar eclipse, when the Moon spends almost 4 hours skimming through the shadow of Earth.  If you've seen a lunar eclipse before, you might be expecting the Moon to turn red--the color of our planet's inner shadow.  But tonight's moon will appear a slivery gray; very much like it always does.  Tonight's eclipse will be a "penumbral" eclipse.  In other words, the Moon will pass through the pale outskirts of our planets shadow (the penumbra) rather than directly through its red core, meaning there will only be a slightly dimming of the moon's surface.
 

AccuT.jpg Matt Wastell of Brisbane, Australia, took this picture during a similar lunar eclipse in April 2005.  Earth's shadow darkens the upper left quadrant of the Moon, producing a gradient of luminosity across the lunar disk.  Overall, the Moon remains silvery gray.

Across Texas, the moon will rise already in eclipse.  (Moon rise in Austin is at 6:12 pm).  The best time to look will be around 6:44 pm Central Time.  That's the time of maximum coverage, when Earth's shadow creates a clear gradient of light and shadow across the lunar disk.  Tonight's eclipse will end at 8:53 pm.  (Content courtesy of spaceweather.com)

You won't need any special equipment to view the eclipse, although binoculars may enhance your viewing experience.

Have a good weekend.

Bob

La Niña is out and El Niño May be Back Soon
Thursday, February 9, 2017 3:38 PM

La Niña is over.  That is what the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center stated Thursday in their monthly El Niño/La Niña update.  It only lasted for a few months but recent observations indicate the Pacific appears to have shifted back to a neutral state; neither La Niña nor El Niño.

In Thursday's report, CPC forecasters indicated that sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific are still slightly below normal, but they have warmed past the threshold for La Nina.  In fact, sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific off the west coast of South America have become much warmer than normal.

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Other atmospheric and oceanic indicators showed some vestiges of the weak La Niña remaining, but overall, the atmosphere and ocean system as a whole is now consistent with ENSO-neutral conditions.

Most computer-forecast solutions predict the continuation of ENSO-neutral conditions through the upcoming spring and summer.  However, a few dynamical forecast models call for the development of a weak El Nino as early as the middle of spring.  Because of typically high uncertainty in forecasts made at this time of the year for the upcoming spring and summer, and some lingering La Niña-like tropical convection patterns in the central Pacific, the consensus of CPC forecasters favors ENSO-neutral conditions this spring with a about a 60% chance.  Thereafter, there are increasing odds for El Niño toward the second half of 2017 (~50% chance in September-November).

As we move into spring, the skill of forecasts for the tropical Pacific should improve significantly, yielding greater confidence as to whether El Niño will develop this summer.

If El Niño were to develop quickly in the next few months, it could potentially reduce levels of Atlantic hurricane activity this summer.  El Niño's impacts on summer weather across the United States are not particularly strong; its main impacts occur in the fall and winter.  For Central Texas, El Niños often bring above average fall and winter precipitation and slightly below normal temperatures.

An updated summer outlook for summer (June/July/August) from the National Multi-Model Ensemble was released Wednesday.  This outlook is a composite of 9 separate dynamic forecast model solutions.

The NMME is calling for above normal temperatures across the entire US, including Texas.
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The outlook also calls for near normal precipitation across Texas.
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Stay tuned for additional updates on the possible development of El Niño over the next couple of months.

Bob

Widespread Rain Expected to Develop Monday into Tuesday
Wednesday, February 8, 2017 5:35 PM


Forecast solutions indicate a period of rain and thunderstorms will develop Sunday and continue into Tuesday as an area of low pressure over the Desert Southwest tracks to the east and northeast.  Out ahead of the area of low pressure, a Canadian cold front is forecast to push south through the region Sunday afternoon and Sunday night.  Unlike the past couple of dry cold fronts, this next front is expected to cause a few light rain showers and isolated thunderstorms Sunday afternoon into Sunday night.

There looks to be an increasing chance for widespread rain showers and isolated thunderstorms Monday into Monday night as the approaching area of low pressure causes an efficient overrunning pattern.  The probability for rain will be near 30 percent Sunday and near 50 percent Sunday night.  The probability for rain will increase to near 70-80 percent Monday and Monday night, then decrease to about 50 percent Tuesday morning.  The chance for rain is forecast to taper off from west to east Tuesday morning into Tuesday afternoon as the area of low pressure exits to the northeast.

Rain amounts between Sunday and Tuesday are generally forecast to average between 1.5 and 2 inches, with some of the highest totals expected across the eastern Hill Country and the Interstate 35 corridor:

NWS rainfall forecast for the period from 6 pm Wednesday through 6 pm next Wednesday:
Rain5.png

Temperatures next Monday and Tuesday will be on the cool side, with highs generally in the mid-50s.  Low temperatures will be in the low and mid-40s.

Long-range forecasts call for dry weather next Wednesday through Friday.  High temperatures will be in the low 60s Wednesday but warm to around 70 degrees on Thursday and Friday.

Bob

Summer-like Temperatures Developed Tuesday
Tuesday, February 7, 2017 6:02 PM

Temperatures Tuesday afternoon reached levels more typical of May, rather than early February.  Abundant sunshine and dry air spreading in behind a Pacific cold front cause the temperature to warm into the lower 80s across the Hill Country and the middle to upper 80s across Central Texas and the middle Texas coast!  These phenomenal readings were about 20 degrees above normal for early February.

Here is a look at Tuesday's high temperatures from LCRA's Hydromet, http://hydromet.lcra.org

Central Texas/Interstate 10 corridor high temperatures:
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Hill Country high temperatures:
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For most locations around Central Texas, Tuesday's readings broke the previous record for February 7th record by 1-2 degrees.

 

  • Austin-Camp Mabry's high temperature of 86 degrees broke the previous record of 85 degrees set in 2013.

     
  • Austin-Bergstrom's high temperature of 88 degrees broke the previous record of 84 degrees set in 1999.

     
  • San Antonio's high temperature of 86 degrees broke the previous record of 84 degrees set in 1999.

     
    Similar summer-like temperatures are forecast to occur Wednesday out ahead of a Canadian cold front.  This front is forecast to push south across Central Texas late Wednesday afternoon and Wednesday evening, bringing cooler temperatures for Thursday and Friday.  High temperatures look to be in the upper 60s Thursday, but bounce back to the middle 70s on Friday.  More 80s will be possible this weekend.

    I'll have a complete update on Wednesday.

    Bob
2017 Austin/Central Texas Skywarn Happening this Saturday
Tuesday, February 7, 2017 4:53 PM

Calling all severe weather enthusiasts.  Please take note of this year's Austin and Central Texas Skywarn.

The 26th Annual Lou Withrow Austin/South Central Texas SkyWarn Training Session will be held this Saturday, February 11th at the ACC Eastview Campus, from 9am to 4pm.  Registration will open at 8:15 am.

This sessions will be instructed by Paul Yura, Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service Austin-San Antonio.  All attendees will become a certified SkyWarn Basic/Advanced Level SkyWarn Spotter.

The sessions will focus on inclement and severe weather recognition as well as safety guidelines to follow during periods of severe and inclement weather.  This year's featured speaker will once again be Kevin Kloesel, director of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey.  

There is no cost/no advanced registration for this session.  Just show up!!

Here is a website with all the details...

http://www.la.utexas.edu/users/kimmel/skywarn.html

Hope to see you there.

Bob

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